Advancing Biology by Bridging Experimental and Computational Sciences

Professor John Rinn has joined the faculty of the University of Colorado in Boulder, to better understand how RNA genes can interact and influence protein gene function. This goal requires high-throughput screening of RNA molecules for those with specific biological activity and creative computational solutions towards understanding the molecular grammar underlying how RNA “speaks” to the cell. Specifically, this requires new training platforms and courses in what is now termed Bioinformatics that seamless blends experimental and computational logic.

Bioinformatics is a new field that blends elements of biology, statistics, computer science, and genetic engineering. It developed as a solution to a major problem: the sheer abundance of data that cannot be analyzed with mechanical devices. Bioinformatics detects data patterns that shed new light on biological processes. With new an emerging applications of machine learning computational methods for deeper insights into big data.

The discipline has streamlined the invention of new treatments for cancer and determined genetic causes for many diseases. Its techniques are well-suited to precision medicine – the customization of medicine to individual circumstances. It also plays a key role in diagnosing and preventing illnesses such as the flu, heart disease, and diabetes.

This growing field has many applications for pharmaceutical companies, software developers and biotechnology. Further evidence of its influence is the fact that more than 45 American colleges and universities now offer degrees in bioinformatics.

Advertisements

HSCI and QBRI Announce Five-Year Collaborative Agreement

John Rinn photograph

As an expert in RNA and genome biology, John Rinn holds the title of Leslie Orgel Professor at the University of Colorado Boulder. John Rinn’s current research focuses on better understanding how the human genome is regulated. In 2016, while a Professor at Harvard University department of Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology he was selected by the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) as an early career scientist for his research into a mysterious class of RNA genes called long noncoding RNAs (lncRNA). Professor Rinn was one of ten Harvard professors to receive the HHMI early career scientist award.

https://news.harvard.edu/gazette/story/2016/09/seven-from-harvard-named-hhmi-faculty-scholars/

And also one of the four Harvard Stem Cell Institute (HSCI) faculty to receive the HHMI early career scientist award:

https://hsci.harvard.edu/news/related-faculty-member/john-rinn

Founded in 2004, the Harvard Stem Cell Institute (HSCI) is dedicated to regenerative medicine and stem cell science. To this end, HSCI maintains eight affiliated hospitals and networks with more than 1000 Harvard-affiliated stem cell scientists. Recently, HSCI announced a five-year collaborative training and research agreement with Qatar Biomedical Research Institute (QBRI).

Through the agreement, the two research institutes will focus on stem cell biology with the intent to establish viable treatments for type 1 and type 2 diabetes, a healthcare challenge gaining in prevalence around the globe. Scientists will form joint research groups, exchange knowledge, and translate advancements into clinical applications. The collaboration hopes to ultimately assist patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes better cope with their condition through the production of new insulin-producing cells.